Kapahikaua Project

Kapahikaua is a federal grant-funded project that is developing future generations of Haku Ho‘oponopono (Lead instructors of ho‘oponopono) in four Native Hawaiian communities: West Moloka‘i, Wai‘anae on O‘ahu, Hāna on Maui, Kekaha on Kaua‘i. This project aims to increase the number of ho‘oponopono practitioners that will be used to address the needs of the community using Hawaiian cultural practices of well-being and balance restoration.

Fewer than seven community-recognized Haku Ho‘oponopono remain in the world—all of whom are currently “inactive” or not mentoring this ʻoihana (occupation, trade, position) regularly across Hawai‘i, and the time Native Hawaiians have to systematically transfer this knowledge to the next generation is closing in fast as these experienced practitioners age and become ill, possibly preventing them from teaching.

The objective is to promote the current four Haku (Lead Instructor) Practitioners to Loea (Distinguished Expert) Practitioners, which is a higher level of readiness because of Loea Practitioners’ ability to promote other individuals. Potential Alakaʻi (Instructor) Practitioners will be promoted to Haku Practitioner. Some of the Haumāna (Students) will also be promoted to Kākoʻo (Assistant) Practitioners, therefore increasing the number of pre-Haku potential candidates in three years. The Loea Practitioners will serve as an advisory board to the Haku Practitioner for the next three years. They will also retain the ability to promote practitioners to the next levels of readiness.
 

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